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Tips for Interpreting your Food Intolerance Test Results
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Tips for Interpreting Your Food Intolerance Test Results

During today's visit, you were given educational materials created by US Biotek, the lab we used to process your food intolerance tests.  The materials, while excellent, can be a bit overwhelming, especially with regard to the "rotation diet" for foods you should cut back on.  Following are practical tips from The Care Group on how to easily interpret your test results and implement a simple rotation diet.

Importance of Food Testing

A high presence of IgG antibodies in your blood indicates that your immune system is responding adversely to certain foods.  Typically, you develop negative reactions to the foods your body is exposed to repeatedly – like too much of a good thing.  Your system rebels by producing antibodies that cause inflammation and, eventually, damage.  Symptoms may include chronic fatigue, digestive distress and leaky gut syndrome. 

Your Panel of Reactionary Foods

Today you received a colorful panel of results from your IgG blood tests, showing your level of reaction to various foods:

Red – Foods in this category are those to which you are highly reactive.  Eliminate these foods from your diet entirely, for at least eight weeks.  Your body's immune response may eventually dissipate, making it possible to reintroduce these foods over time, in limited quantities. 

Yellow – Foods in this category are those to which you're moderately reactive.  Limit your exposure to these foods by following a rotation diet (see below).

Green – Your system tolerates these foods well.  Feel free to keep eating them, along with a varied diet.  Variety prevents negative reactions to any one food or food family.

Related Food Families

The 30-page booklet you received today lists foods that are closely related to the ones for which you were actually tested.  Chances are good that if you reacted negatively to a particular food, you may have a similar reaction to other members of the same family.  The foods for which you were tested are printed in orange. 

A Simple Approach to Rotation Diets

Rotation diets can seem complicated, but they don't need to be.  Simply limit consumption of your Yellow (or moderately reactive) foods to once every four days.  That's all there is to it.  For example, if you're moderately reactive to milk and you drink it on Monday, wait until Thursday before you have more.

Don't Forget Probiotics

In addition to eliminating or cutting back on foods that make you feel bad, be sure to ingest the things your body is deficient in.  These include any vitamins or minerals recommended by your Care Group practitioner, as well as a quality probiotic to increase the number of "good bacteria" in your gut – a critical step toward decreasing reactions to foods.

More questions?  Please call your health practitioner at The Care Group, 303-343-3121.

Home > Articles > Tips for Interpreting Your Food Intolerance Test Results

 

Tips for Interpreting Your Food Intolerance Test Results

During today's visit, you were given educational materials created by US Biotek, the lab we used to process your food intolerance tests. The materials, while excellent, can be a bit overwhelming, especially with regard to the "rotation diet" for foods you should cut back on. Following are practical tips from The Care Group on how to easily interpret your test results and implement a simple rotation diet.

Importance of Food Allergy Testing

A high presence of IgG antibodies in your blood indicates that your immune system is responding adversely to certain foods. Typically, you develop negative reactions to the foods your body is exposed to repeatedly – like too much of a good thing. Your system rebels by producing antibodies that cause inflammation and, eventually, damage. Symptoms may include chronic fatigue, digestive distress and leaky gut syndrome.

Your Panel of Reactionary Foods

Today you received a colorful panel of results from your IgG blood tests, showing your level of reaction to various foods:

Red – Foods in this category are those to which you are highly reactive. Eliminate these foods from your diet entirely, for at least eight weeks. Your body's immune response may eventually dissipate, making it possible to reintroduce these foods over time, in limited quantities.

Yellow – Foods in this category are those to which you're moderately reactive. Limit your exposure to these foods by following a rotation diet (see below).

Green – Your system tolerates these foods well. Feel free to keep eating them, along with a varied diet. Variety prevents negative reactions to any one food or food family.

Related Food Families

The 30-page booklet you received today lists foods that are closely related to the ones for which you were actually tested. Chances are good that if you reacted negatively to a particular food, you may have a similar reaction to other members of the same family. The foods for which you were tested are printed in orange.

A Simple Approach to Rotation Diets

Rotation diets can seem complicated, but they don't need to be. Simply limit consumption of your Yellow (or moderately reactive) foods to once every four days. That's all there is to it. For example, if you're moderately reactive to milk and you drink it on Monday, wait until Thursday before you have more.

Don't Forget Probiotics

In addition to eliminating or cutting back on foods that make you feel bad, be sure to ingest the things your body is deficient in. These include any vitamins or minerals recommended by your Care Group practitioner, as well as a quality probiotic to increase the number of "good bacteria" in your gut – a critical step toward decreasing reactions to foods.

More questions? Please call your health practitioner at The Care Group, 303-343-3121. 

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Last Updated on Monday, 10 October 2011 02:42